BAISER FLORENTIN
Legend has it that the man who invented this biscuit for the powerful Medici family of Florence brought the recipe back to France. Candied fruit flirts with caramel before being dipped into rich chocolate. The result is this crisp, decadent treat called a Florentine Kiss.
CROQ’AMOURS
A lot of love (“amour”) went into these bite-size crunchy clouds of raspberry, coffee and vanilla meringue. The French chef François Massialot invented meringue in the 17th Century. Whole almonds and hazelnut add a sweet and nutty contrast to this intriguing mix of textures. Prepare to be smitten.
DÉLICE À LA ROSE
These heart-shaped biscuits will immerse your lover in a delicate perfume of rose and almond.
ÉTOILE À LA CANNELLE
Combining spicy cinnamon, sweet almonds and Alsatian spices, these star-shaped biscuits come to you direct from Strasbourg’s famous Christmas market. The region of Alsace borders Germany and the German influence is strong. Pair “cinnamon stars” with mulled wine for an unforgettable winter treat.
MADELEINE DE COMMERCY
This is the famous shell-shaped spongecake that triggered Proust's childhood memories. In 1755, the Duke of Lorraine was hosting the writer Voltaire at his castle and wanted to serve an original dessert. When the pastry chef quit abruptly, a resourceful maid named Madeleine rescued the evening by baking this treasure.
PATIENCE chocolate
These sweet round biscuits are adapted from a traditional recipe for anise biscuits and took two years to perfect, hence the name “patience”. Choose from three varieties—the rose of Provence, the ginger of Asia and the jasmine of China—and you’ll see how the baker’s patience paid off.
PATIENCE flowers
These sweet round biscuits are adapted from a traditional recipe for anise biscuits and took two years to perfect, hence the name “patience”. Choose from three varieties—the rose of Provence, the ginger of Asia and the jasmine of China—and you’ll see how the baker’s patience paid off.
PATIENCE fruits
These sweet round biscuits are adapted from a traditional recipe for anise biscuits and took two years to perfect, hence the name “patience”. Choose from three varieties—the rose of Provence, the ginger of Asia and the jasmine of China—and you’ll see how the baker’s patience paid off.
SABLÉ POMME - SABLÉ CITRON
The sablé is a classic French biscuit created by the Marquise de Sablé in 1670, in Sablé-sur-Sarthe, (Normandy). The French word “sable” means “sand”, perhaps relating to these soft, delicate, crumbly texture biscuits and their golden color. The apple imbues the crumbly butter biscuit with a delicious and fruity twist. You prefer a sour taste? Try the lemon flavored one, you won’t regret it.
SPECULOS
In northern France, you would eat spéculos on St. Nicholas’s Day, December 6th. These ornate ginger and cinnamon biscuits shaped like St. Nick are perfect with a cup of strong coffee. The name is derived from the Latin word “speculator” which means “bishop” or “observer.”
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